Your diet: Part of the Solution or the Problem?

Reduce your impact – eat responsibly! The WWF International recently published its annual Living Planet Report for 2020. It provides an overview of where we are at in the pursuit of preserving our natural world and the ecosystems on which we depend. All this talking about the planet’s ecosystem, biodiversity loss, extinction etc. How does it translate to your everyday life? What does...

Dunja Karabaic: Sustainable spill over and the Joy Of Missing Out

Introducing Mrs. Karabaic As a young student, Dunja Karabaic felt that tight definitions and strict separations were not appropriate. Towards the end of her studies at the University of Fine Arts Hamburg the traditional arts market she was to enter appeared to Dunja as flat, hollow and exclusive: you either are in it, stick to its laws and rules, cooperate with an art...

Green New Deal for the Arts

Green New Deal for the Arts

Sustainability in Art: a mere Subject? The fact that artists have made sustainability a subject of their work has become rather common. Numerous not only talk about it but criticise wasteful behaviour or offer alternatives. They put the topic at the heart of their creation. They raise awareness of the urgency of this matter. But are they also sustainable...

Icebergs in Greenland are melting

On the Rise of Environmental Art

Art triggers emotions Art gives a human voice to societal or environmental ‘complications’ (yes, avoiding the ‘p’ word here on purpose). Art can bring attention to certain aspects of specific magnitude like injustice, exploitation… or wonder. Art triggers an emotional response. We all know that the response differs significantly and is unpredictable. Art can bring forth cognitive activation, too. You linger on the...

nurture the seed and it will blossom’ - Maori proverb

Legal Personhood for Nature?! From New Zealand to the Rest of the World

From New Zealand New Zealand is the first country that has granted personhood rights to natural entities and landmarks; landmarks that are of divine and spiritual importance to the Māori, the native population of Aotearoa – New Zealand. In the worldview of the Māori, these landmarks are perceived as ancestors as we humans together with all animals and plants...

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